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Long, Isn’t It?

Be­low you will find some XML. The XML is for text ob­jects, and part of it is sup­posed to let you link” text from one text ob­ject to an­other. What I’d like to know is, can it be adapted to CSS? If it can, how would you do it? In any case here is the code, with what I think are the per­ti­nent parts put into bold.

<PAGEOBJECT
XPOS=”153
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OwnPage=”0
ItemID=”105245888
PTYPE=”4
WIDTH=”252
HEIGHT=”210
FRTYPE=”0
CLIPEDIT=”0
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PLINEART=”1
LOCALSCX=”1
LOCALSCY=”1
LOCALX=”0
LOCALY=”0
LOCALROT=”0
PICART=”1
SCALETYPE=”1
RATIO=”1
COLUMNS=”1
COLGAP=”0
AUTOTEXT=”0
EXTRA=”0
TEXTRA=”0
BEXTRA=”0
REXTRA=”0
VAlign=”0
FLOP=”0
PLTSHOW=”0
BASEOF=”0
textPathType=”0
textPathFlipped=”0
path=”M0 0 L252 0 L252 210 L0 210 L0 0 Z” 
copath=”M0 0 L252 0 L252 210 L0 210 L0 0 Z” 
gXpos=”153
gYpos=”60
gWidth=”0
gHeight=”0
LAYER=”0
NEXTITEM=”47972848
BACKITEM=”-1″>

<Sto­ry­Text>

<DefaultStyle/​>

<trail/​>

</​StoryText>

</​PAGEOBJECT>

<PAGEOBJECT
XPOS=”171
YPOS=”282.75
OwnPage=”0
ItemID=”47972848
PTYPE=”4
WIDTH=”418.5
HEIGHT=”140.25
FRTYPE=”0
CLIPEDIT=”0
PWIDTH=”1
PLINEART=”1
LOCALSCX=”1
LOCALSCY=”1
LOCALX=”0
LOCALY=”0
LOCALROT=”0
PICART=”1
SCALETYPE=”1
RATIO=”1
COLUMNS=”1
COLGAP=”0
AUTOTEXT=”0
EXTRA=”0
TEXTRA=”0
BEXTRA=”0
REXTRA=”0
VAlign=”0
FLOP=”0
PLTSHOW=”0
BASEOF=”0
textPathType=”0
textPathFlipped=”0
path=”M0 0 L418.5 0 L418.5 140.25 L0 140.25 L0 0 Z” 
copath=”M0 0 L418.5 0 L418.5 140.25 L0 140.25 L0 0 Z” 
gXpos=”171
gYpos=”282.75
gWidth=”0
gHeight=”0
LAYER=”0
NEXTITEM=”-1
BACKITEM=”105245888″/>

</​DOCUMENT>

</​SCRIBUSUTF8NEW>

Thank you for you as­sis­tance

Rec­om­mend, Re­spect, Thought­ful, and Use­ful But­tons pow­ered by the En­gag­ing News Project

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When in the Bleak…


strange-garden-1200

When in the Spring

The Rev­erend Wy­smith has a dream. The dream that one day he will prove the truth of res­ur­rec­tion to a doubt­ing world. The prob­lem is, he has no tal­ent in that area. The ti­tle, Rev­erend” is some­thing he ap­plied to him­self, hav­ing had no real ed­u­ca­tion or for­mal train­ing in what be­ing a rev­erend is all about.

Still, he col­lects corpses from var­i­ous lo­ca­tions, but es­pe­cialy where the poor, the aban­doned, and the des­ti­tute can be found.

Be­cause he col­lects the un­wanted, and be­cause the au­thor­i­ties don’t want to spend the money needed to deal with him, he and his gar­den are ig­nored. That is, un­til just re­cently.

For now sto­ries are reach­ing the au­thor­i­ties that the Reverend’s bod­ies are start­ing to get up and wan­der about. Some say the good Rev­erend may not be able to res­ur­rect peo­ple, but he can an­i­mate their re­mains. Oth­ers in­sist the per­am­bu­lat­ing de­ceased are ac­tu­ally the work of pol­ter­geists and the like. How­ever it is hap­pen­ing the dead from Wycliff’s gar­dens have been seen walk­ing the streets, go­ing into shops and tav­erns, and as­sailal­ing peo­ple from young to old.

What the party does about this is their busi­ness. Why they do any­thing about this is their busi­ness. And there are al­ways those who will in­sist that the party are the ones be­hind it all. This all could be some­thing the party may not ex­pect. And maybe the Rev­erend Wy­smith is rais­ing the dead.

Rec­om­mend, Re­spect, Thought­ful, and Use­ful But­tons pow­ered by the En­gag­ing News Project

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The Neighbors

The Problem

From the very be­gin­ning — be­fore most of you were even born — RPGs in gen­eral have had a big prob­lem. That prob­lem be­ing a ten­dency on the part of oh so many play­ers to mer­rily slaugh­ter those around them.

Why They Do This

The an­swer to that is re­ally quite sim­ple, they just don’t see the con­se­quences. Of­ten it’s for one of two rea­sons.

The first is, all too of­ten the player is just too young to ap­pre­ci­ate the con­se­quences. It’s not that he’s un­aware that there could be any, it’s more that he’d rather not take con­se­quences into ac­count be­cause they could wreck his fun.

You need to re­mem­ber that here we are most of­ten deal­ing with ado­les­cents, and even the best ado­les­cent is ba­si­cally a spoiled brat. Even when they know they need to be aware of what they ac­tions can mean they’d much rather not pay it any at­ten­tion. Yes, a 17 year old is grow­ing up, he’s just not grown up yet.

Even Worse

What makes mat­ters worse is our role in re­fus­ing to take mat­ters se­ri­ously. I’m talk­ing about adults here. Too damn many pu­ta­tive adults in­sist that we have the right to be spoiled brats; some­thing about free­dom of ex­pres­sion. We take too much pride in our re­fusal to grow up and act re­spon­si­bly. Sorry, it don’t work that way. We are part of a so­ci­ety with other peo­ple in­volved, and as long as oth­ers are in­volved you are re­spon­si­ble for how you treat them.

In RPGs

Here it of­ten comes down to a de­sire on the part of some GMs to avoid spoil­ing his play­ers’ fun by mak­ing their char­ac­ters be­have them­selves. And part of that is be­cause the GM doesn’t re­ally know how to han­dle the mat­ter. All too of­ten the so­lu­tion is a mat­ter of meta-gam­ing. That is, in­flict­ing a rule that seeks to ban anti so­cial be­hav­ior in the course of play. It’s what you get when you keep in­sist­ing that an RPG has to be a game.

What the GM re­ally needs to do is to get the so­ci­ety in the set­ting he’s us­ing in­volved. The first step in do­ing that is to start ac­cept­ing that the roles not taken by the play­ers are peo­ple in their own right, even if they are imag­i­nary. Which is to say they mat­ter.

Incident

Some years ago I in­tro­duced a young man to an Heroic Per­son­age of mine — a sort of GM’s char­ac­ter. The HPg, an al­chemist by the name of Aeros Aristo­phanes, had some po­tions in stor­age, and that stor­age had pro­tec­tion. The lad com­plained loudly be­cause he saw no way any char­ac­ter he played could safely steal Aeros’ po­tions. When I tried telling him Aeros had a right to his prop­erty he got up­set, be­cause only Player Char­ac­ters could have any rights in his opin­ion.

The Mark

That’s the mark of a spoiled brat, that only they mat­ter. Only the play­ers’ char­ac­ters count. Only the play­ers’ char­ac­ters can count. A char­ac­ter is not be­ing played by a player? Then he can be safely ig­nored.

I re­al­ize that play­ing an RPG is all about be­ing able to do things we can’t in real life, but do we need to lie to our­selves? Do we need to in­sist that oth­ers don’t mat­ter? For one thing I’ve no­ticed is, how we treat those we don’t know in an RPG is how we tend to treat oth­ers we don’t know in real life.

Further Consequences

And then we end up miss­ing so much. We miss meet­ing peo­ple. We miss mak­ing friends with char­ac­ters who could be in­ter­est­ing or even help­ful. We miss out on op­por­tu­ni­ties to be­come en­gaged with oth­ers in ways that make play more en­joy­able than what it al­ready is. For the big part of an RPG is the peo­ple you meet as you play your role. Get­ting in­volved with the peo­ple around us means more op­por­tu­ni­ties to do things, and do­ing things is what RPGs are all about.

I hope this is clear, for I’m hav­ing some­thing of a melt down. All part of be­ing autis­tic, and it’s a bleedin pain. If you can phrase it bet­ter than I, go right ahead.

Rec­om­mend, Re­spect, Thought­ful, and Use­ful But­tons pow­ered by the En­gag­ing News Project

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Too Strong a Magic


flew-trunk-1200

Too Strong a Magic

Jerry is a wiz­ard. Jerry is a pow­er­ful wiz­ard. Jerry is a klutz. Jerry doesn’t re­ally un­der­stand his magic, hav­ing at best a tech­ni­cal knowl­edge and a tech­ni­cal ex­per­tise. He knows how to do magic, he just doesn’t un­der­stand why he shouldn’t but so much into his magic. Jerry is of the opin­ion that if a few dees1 of mag­i­cal en­ergy will do the job, then a few kilo-dees will do the job even bet­ter. So he ends up in lots of trou­ble.

How the party gets in­volved is up to them; though hope­fully it won’t take much per­sua­sion on the part of the GM. their role will be to get the young fool to start us­ing some com­mon sense when it comes to his magic, though it may take a lot of per­sua­sion. Nat­u­rally, Jerry’s shenani­gans will get him and the party into a lot of trou­ble.

This is not meant to be the seed to a se­ri­ous ad­ven­ture, though how the play­ers han­dle it is up to them. Though keep in mind that just willy-nilly butcher­ing poor Jerry should not be an op­tion un­der any rea­son­able cir­cum­stance.

Rec­om­mend, Re­spect, Thought­ful, and Use­ful But­tons pow­ered by the En­gag­ing News Project

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I Moved, Finally

I can now be found at In­finite Ad­ven­tures. Which is the old name, but at a new URL. Which isn’t re­ally a new URL, just the old one with­out a now ex­tra­ne­ous di­rec­tory. Given time I will be adding sub-do­mains and in ef­fect mak­ing this a sort of multi-site in­stal­la­tion. Stay tuned for more news.

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When the Boss is Away

marinoni-printing-press1-1200

There is a print­ing shop. It is an old print­ing shop in an old part of town. The equip­ment is old and re­quires con­stant care and at­ten­tion. The shop has but one printer, which is older than the cur­rent pro­pri­etor. His cus­tomers all ad­vise him to re­place it, but he re­fuses. The printer can­not han­dle large jobs, the qual­ity can vary wildly, and the pa­per and ink have a habit of jam­ming or smear­ing re­gard­less of how care­fully the printer works with it.

That is when there are peo­ple there.

When there is no one there late at night the printer comes to life. Ink is ap­plied to the ma­chine, pa­per placed in the bins. Yet there is never any­one around to see this. And when the ma­chine is ready it be­gins to print.

It prints as much as it needs to, as much as is nec­es­sary. How it gets what it prints is a mys­tery. How the job is bun­dled up and de­liv­ered is a mys­tery as well. But still when­ever there is a scan­dal or news that needs to be dis­trib­uted that in­for­ma­tion is printed on this printer and made avail­able through­out the city.

The print­ing is al­ways clear, the let­ters al­ways leg­i­ble and the writ­ing com­pre­hen­si­ble. The pa­per never jams, and when the job is done the shop is cleaned up and ready for busi­ness the fol­low­ing morn­ing.

The au­thor­i­ties don’t dare shut it down. Oth­ers have tried, only to have their schemes and machi­na­tions ex­posed in fur­ther print­ings. Those who would cen­sor or bowd­ler­ize the work of oth­ers will find un­ex­pur­gated copies of their butch­ery made avail­able next to what they would seek to pass on as proper. Lies are ex­posed, fraud is re­vealed. When­ever and wherever peo­ple would see the pub­lic mis­lead their work is ex­posed.

Nat­u­rally there are those who would see this print­ing ma­chine de­stroyed. At the very least the work it pro­duces dis­cred­ited. How the play­ers get in­volved, or why, is up to them and their guide mas­ter. How they deal with the prob­lem is up to them.

Please note that any plan on their part to use the ma­chine to their il­licit ad­van­tage can lead to the printer ex­pos­ing their plot. This is not the sort of thing that only ben­e­fits those who would mis­use it.

Rec­om­mend, Re­spect, Thought­ful, and Use­ful But­tons pow­ered by the En­gag­ing News Project

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And Here I Thought

I thought I’d be mov­ing In­finite Ad­ven­tures to a new lo­ca­tion on this server, only to learn that that is ap­par­ently a car­di­nal sin in the world of The Web, and that one would have to do all sorts of penance for merely think­ing about it. And/​or go through a long and com­pli­cated rit­ual in­volv­ing the sac­ri­fice of nu­mer­ous crea­tures, ob­jects, and peo­ple in all sorts of grue­some ways while do­ing hard­core yoga poses and recit­ing long lists of Ger­man bio­chem­i­cal names. Do nerds re­ally need to be such in­se­cure twits?

Rec­om­mend, Re­spect, Thought­ful, and Use­ful But­tons pow­ered by the En­gag­ing News Project

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I’m Moving!

Guide: How to Use a Grenade.

How to Use a Grenade

Con­trary to Monty Python us­ing a grenade does not have to be com­pli­cated, and most cer­tainly does not re­quire in­volved in­struc­tions. Nor does it re­quire over think­ing, which is what screws over so many re­cruits in com­bat train­ing. By fol­low­ing the steps be­low the user should be able to safely han­dle a de­vice such as a grenade with­out en­dan­ger­ing him­self or oth­ers. If a calamity still oc­curs then it’s ob­vi­ously be­cause the user had to in­sist on think­ing too much in­stead of just fol­low­ing sim­ple in­struc­tions. Any­body who tells you any dif­fer­ent is ob­vi­ously a fool who has yet to es­cape from his par­ents’ base­ment.



Step One

Pull pin.

Don’t push, don’t bend, don’t twist, just pull


Step Two

Count to 3.

And the num­ber you count shall be three. You shall not count one, nor shall you count two un­less it then be to count to three


Step Three

Throw grenade.

As you would a ball or a rock, but not a tizzy.

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The Publisher’s Life is Not an Easy One

Most es­pe­cially when you’re talk­ing about a mi­cro pub­lisher like me, hav­ing to use tools that are ei­ther badly de­signed, badly ex­plained, or both.

But then I ran into a Word­Press plugin called Step by Step. With Step by Step you’re sup­posed to be able to provide in­struc­tions on how to do things and a way that can be un­der­stood. So I’m go­ing to give that a try.

That means I’m go­ing to be pre­sent­ing Mythus us­ing Step by Step, and I’m hop­ing it works. We’ll see.

Rec­om­mend, Re­spect, Thought­ful, and Use­ful But­tons pow­ered by the En­gag­ing News Project

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